‘Hawkeye’ From Page to Screen: Episode 3.2

How Marvel Studios’ Hawkeye adapted select sequences from the Matt Fraction and David Aja Hawkeye comic run.

Marvel Studios’ Hawkeye is starting to hit its stride as it delivered its best episode yet in “Echoes” where, as in previous episodes, we again find several references to the Matt Fraction and David Aja’s Hawkeye comic run. After focusing on how Episode 1 incorporated the introduction of Lucky the Pizza Dog, and Episode 2 featured Clint’s capture by the Tracksuit Mafia we have now also looked at how Episode 3 adapted the stand-out car chase sequence. Considering that this episode justified more than one article it is now time to focus on some interesting elements scattered throughout say sequence: the trick arrows.

‘Hawkeye’ #3 (2012)

Clint already has a history of using several types of arrows in the MCU, suited for each occasion, but Episode 3 takes them to a new level. As with the car chase, these came straight from the pages of Hawkeye #3, one of the most kinetic issues of the entire run. But according to artist and comic series co-creator David Aja, we have Ellio R. Brown to thank as it was his work in The Official Handbook of the Marvel Universe #5 published in 1986 that inspired both Fraction and Aja to create the pages that were to become Hawkeye #3.

The Official Handbook of the Marvel Universe V.2 – Deluxe Edition #05
The Official Handbook of the Marvel Universe V.2 – Deluxe Edition #05
The Official Handbook of the Marvel Universe V.2 – Deluxe Edition #05

From the 14 arrow-types Brown designed in the 80s, Fraction and Aja managed to use 12 of them in Hawkeye #3. A few were simply referenced, but most were actually put up to good use against the Tracksuit Mafia. Fast-forward a few years and, out of those 12, Marvel Studios’ Hawkeye re-used 7 of them in Episode 3, most with slight changes to them.

Putty Arrow

Marvel Studios’ ‘Hawkeye’ Episode 3

The first arrow that Kate Bishop manages to fire at the pursuing Bros. It initially looks an awful lot like Ego, The Living Planet’s expanding seedlings we saw in Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2, before turning into a soft and malleable paste that blocks the Tracksuits’ windshield almost entirely. Kate ends up not using it as Clint intended, on the truck’s tires, as it would quickly harden thus definitively disabling the vehicle. The show also goes for a Hawkeye Purple whereas the comics, that have Clint holding the bow, go with a simple black-looking ooze that sort of glues one Bro to the asphalt.

‘Hawkeye’ #3 (2012)

Explosive Tip Arrow

Marvel Studios’ ‘Hawkeye’ Episode 3

The most obvious and probably one of the handiest arrows in Clint’s arsenal. Not suitable for close-quarter combat but good for basically everything else. Kate still manages to get surprised by the explosion as if she hadn’t witnessed even bigger ones a decade earlier – We all saw the flashbacks, Kate! -. It did the trick though as that Trust a Bro moving van’s DVD player stealing days are as dead as DVD players themselves. In the comics, Clint and Kate were being pursued by Mini Coopers so anything that arrow did to a van, it probably did twice as much with twice the ease to those smallish compact city cars.

‘Hawkeye’ #3 (2012)

Suction Tip Arrow

Marvel Studios’ ‘Hawkeye’ Episode 3

Initially treated as a gag it ended up as probably the most important (and peaceful) of arrows as it was used not to take lives, but to save them. Just like in the comics Clint uses it so as not to fall from a moving vehicle, saving Kate from having a shorter MCU career than Quicksilver. That would have been a major Bohn.. bummer. The suction-tip arrow proves to be the real MVP.

Marvel Studios’ ‘Hawkeye’ Episode 3
‘Hawkeye’ #3 (2012)

Bola Arrow

Marvel Studios’ ‘Hawkeye’ Episode 3

Ok so, I’m not totally sure on this one but a couple more people agreed that this might be it so here it goes. Kate used a Bola Arrow to get all those pine trees on top of the Putty Truck. It ended up being a bit more effective than the one Clint shot in the comics that managed to get a chuckle out of a couple of Bros. And, seriously, if you can’t hurt a Bro with an arrow with that much potential you should really be contemplating what you’re even doing with your life with a tequila shot in your hand. Point Bishop.

‘Hawkeye’ #3 (2012)

Acid Arrow

Marvel Studios’ ‘Hawkeye’ Episode 3

Kate proved herself as an incredible archer with these shots alone. Clint, on the other hand, shot a Mini Cooper as it was facing him. Good for him. The subtlety of this specific arrow was better applied in the show as it allowed for a precise and disruptive use of the arrow in a way not many other types could. Since it was Clint’s idea to use it as they did he does end up deserving some recognition. Even if it was Kate doing all the work.

‘Hawkeye’ #3 (2012)

Smoke Arrow

Marvel Studios’ ‘Hawkeye’ Episode 3

Again with the “Hawkeye Purple”, we get it. Kate manages to shoot it inside the Dodge Challenger which proves a much better idea than using it on the outside as Clint does in the comics. Could it be much worse than the usual NYC air pollution? My guess is Clint ended up doing the Tracksuits a favor. “Bro five!”

‘Hawkeye’ #3 (2012)

Cable Arrow

Marvel Studios’ ‘Hawkeye’ Episode 3

One of the most well-known types of arrows we’ve seen Clint use over the years. In fact, this was one of the first-ever arrows Kate saw Hawkeye shoot first-hand as she witnessed his escape from the Chitauri in the Battle of New York. This was perhaps the main reason she knew what to do when he jumped off the bridge and therefore managed to grab the bow in order to swing into the train tracks beneath. In the comic Clint uses it to rip through a Mini Cooper, stripping it of its roof (see the Smoke Arrow image above). This probably speaks more of Clint’s upper body strength than the Mini Coopers’ lack of frame reliability.

‘Hawkeye’ #3 (2012)

USB Arrow

Marvel Studios’ ‘Hawkeye’ Episode 3

Not present in Hawkeye #3, we get to see it put to good use seventeen issues later in Hawkeye #20 as Kate searches a computer for financial logs. I don’t know what’s more laughable, the fact that the pen drive only holds 256Mb of data or that the arrow exists in the first place. Either way, it opens up the door for future variations such as the LaserDisc Arrow (similar to the Predator’s Smart Disc) or the Kitchen Sink Arrow for the upcoming Young Avengers vs Looney Tunes.

‘Hawkeye’ #20 (2014)

Pym Particle Arrow III (Goliath Arrow)

Marvel Studios’ ‘Hawkeye’ Episode 3

This isn’t something we’ve witnessed in the MCU (yet!) but in the comics, it is said that Hawkeye has three types of Pym Particle Arrows:

  • Pym Particle Arrow I (The Reduction Arrow) utilizes the famous size-shifting science to decrease the target’s size and strength.
  • Pym Particle Arrow II (The Growing Barrage) creates a swarm of arrows by releasing an entire shrunken volley at once.
  • Pym Particle Arrow III (The Goliath Arrow) uses Pym Particles for growth and is used to trigger his transformation into Goliath.

As we see in this panel taken from Hawkeye: Blindspot #3 where Clint is doing his best giant Stay Puft Marshmallow Man impression, Clint has used it on himself while the show stuck to it being used on an inanimate object. All kidding aside, it was one of the best moments of the entire episode as it established a sense of the connected universe Marvel Studios intends these shows to have. All in a way that felt so natural, not needing any sort of exposition dump to have it make absolute sense.

‘Hawkeye: Blindspot’ #3 (2011)

Episode four is just around the corner (it’s tomorrow!) so we’ll be getting to the next few From Page to Screen in just a few hours. See you next week!

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